You have the right:

  • To know who is interviewing you and what newspaper, magazine, television or radio station they represent.
  • To be treated courteously. The questions can be tough, but the reporter's demeanor should not be abusive.
  • To physical comfort during the filming or taping of the interview – appropriate setting, chair, make up, a glass of water.
  • To not be physically threatened by hand-held lights or microphones shoved into your face.
  • To make your own tape of an interview or to have someone such as a public information officer in the room during an interview. You should inform the reporter of this in advance, however, as they may choose not to conduct the interview if you insist on having a third party present.
  • To ensure security of your laboratory and to protect it from damage from cameras or other equipment.
  • To get some of your points across in the interview. Don't just answer the reporter's questions. Use your messages. Tell your story.
  • To be quoted accurately.
  • To protect the privacy of yourself, your students, colleagues or patients by withholding information that is not public.
  • To establish ground rules, such as time and location.
  • To terminate an interview if your rights are violated.